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Quinnipiac Poll: Republicans Split Between Trump vs. DeSantis

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Florida - Sunday November 27, 2022: Forty-Three percent of all voters, regardless of party affiliation, said they would prefer Florida Governor Ron DeSantis over former President Donald Trump as the Republican nominee for President in 2024, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released last week.

However Republicans, who will decide who their 2024 Presidential nominee is at the GOP convention, were evenly divided, 44% for Trump, and 44% for DeSantis

“Too early to even suggest it's a preview of 2024, but some 700 days out, Trump, who has thrown his hat into the ring, and DeSantis, who is holding his cards close to his chest, are in a dead heat among Republicans,” said Quinnipiac University Polling Analyst Tim Malloy.

DeSantis

60% of Republicans said they would like to see DeSantis run for president in 2024, 26% don't want him to run, while 14% declined to offer an opinion.

However amongst all voters, regardless of party affiliation, 44% said they don't want to see DeSantis run, while 37% said they hope he does. 19% did not offer an opinion.

Trump

A week after the former President announced he was running again 57% of voters, regardless of party affiliation, oppose his bid for the White House again, 37% favor it.

However the poll found that Republicans strongly support Trumps effort to become President again with 62% favoring his campaign, and 27% opposed.

However an overwhelming number of Democrats oppose Trump's effort at getting elected again, 88 said they think it is a "bad thing".

Still, roughly half of Americans, 49%, think it's either very likely, 18%, or somewhat likely, 31%, that Donald Trump will win another presidential election

"An underwhelming welcome back to the political battlefield for Donald Trump comes with a mixed message...nearly 60 percent of Americans say they do not want to see him back in the Oval Office, but nearly half of Americans think it's likely," said Polling Analyst Malloy.